Modelling cross-reactivity and memory in the cellular adaptive immune response to influenza infection in the host

Ada W. C. Yana , Pengxing Caoa , Jane M. Heffernan b,c, Jodie McVernond,e,f, Kylie M. Quinn g,h, Nicole L. La Grutag,h, Karen L. Laurie i,j,g, James M. McCaw a,e,f.Modelling cross-reactivity and memory in the cellular adaptive immune response to influenza infection in the host. Journal of Theoretical Biology. Accepted 2016 Nov 8.


Abstract

The cellular adaptive immune response plays a key role in resolving influenza infection. It can provide cross-protection between subtypes of influenza A which share epitopes; thus, the strength of the immune response to a given strain is dependent upon the individual’s infection history. We model cross-reactive cellular adaptive immune responses induced by multiple infections, and show how the formation and re-activation of memory T cells explains observed shortening of a second infection when cross-reactivity is present. We include three possible mechanisms which determine the strength of the cross-reactive immune response. Our model of cross-reactivity contributes to understanding how repeated exposures change an individual’s immune profile over a lifetime.

 

a-School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia

b Department of Mathematics and Statistics, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3

c Modelling Infection and Immunity Lab, Centre for Disease Modelling, York Institute for Health Research, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3

d Doherty Epidemiology, Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia

e Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia

f Modelling and Simulation, Infection and Immunity Theme, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia

g Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia

h Infection and Immunity Program and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia

i WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia

j School of Applied and Biomedical Sciences, Federation University, Churchill, VIC 3842, Australia

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